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Rocket Men

Robert Kurson’s Rocket Men Selected as “A Novel Idea” 2019 Community Read

Programming for “A Novel Idea” begins on April 6, 2019. What follows is three weeks of programs that explore and expound upon the themes and ideas found in Rocket Men. The programming culminates with a free presentation by author Robert Kurson on Sunday, April 28, at 4:00 p.m. at Bend High School. A book signing will follow Kurson’s presentation. All programs, including the author’s presentation, are free of charge thanks to the support of the Deschutes Public Library Foundation. Free tickets are required for Kurson’s talk; they will be available to the public on April 6 online and in all Deschutes Public Libraries.

Upcoming "A Novel Idea" Events

Full Calendar

  • Mar 27

    5:30 PM - Wednesday - Meeting Room

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors.

    "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.


     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Sisters Public Library

  • Apr 4

    5:00 PM - Thursday - COCC - Barber Library

    Celebrate student art work inspired by Rocket Men on display in the Barber Library rotunda on the COCC campus.

    Refreshments and live music.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 6

    11:00 AM - Saturday - Meeting Room

    Explore how women in the 1960s contributed to NASA and broke barriers along the way.

    As NASA reached for the Moon in the late 1960s, women in the U.S. contributed to that effort and broke barriers in many other areas of American life. From the STEM fields to the corporate boardroom and from the university to the streets, women challenged their exclusion from positions of power and fought for the opportunity to contribute to the ground-breaking advancements of the era.

    Jamie Bufalino is an instructor in the Departments of History and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Oregon. She has a doctorate in History specializing in the histories of gender, race, and sexuality in the United States with special emphasis on social movements and consumer culture. She has taught extensively and conducted research in the areas of representations of race, gender, and sexuality in U.S. beauty culture, specifically advertising, as well as on the history of feminist movements in the U.S.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Sisters Public Library

  • Apr 6

    2:00 PM - Saturday - Meeting Room

    Astronaut Jim Wetherbee shares space stories.

    Former NASA astronaut, Jim Wetherbee, the only American astronaut to have commanded five space missions, shares stories of Apollo 8 and what it took to get the first astronauts around the moon and back.

    In 1968, for the first time in Earth's four and a half billion year history, three men got up one morning - and left. Who was responsible for the decision to send men to the Moon on that first flight? How do people make such decisions? Astronauts eagerly climb onto a rocket and live or die as a consequence of their own decisions. But what does it take to live with the decisions made in the Mission Control Center when other people live or die as a result?

    Since the beginning of the space program, astronauts have developed techniques based on the principles of operating excellence to make effective decisions and execute missions while staying alive in unforgiving environments. Hear how these principles-based techniques can help each of us optimize performance in hazardous operations, business, and everyday life to help us accomplish much more in our dangerous world - or out of this world!

    With thirty-five years of experience in high-hazard operational environments, Jim is passionate about helping leaders and operators in dangerous endeavors with critical mission objectives.
    Jim began his career as a Naval Aviator aboard the USS John F Kennedy, flying the A-7 Corsair. In his second tour, he was a test pilot in the F/A-18 Hornet.

    In 1984, Jim was selected to join NASA in its tenth group of astronauts. Over his twenty-year career, he flew six times on the Space Shuttle. The five-time commander flew two missions to the Russian Space Station, Mir, and two missions to the International Space Station. In 1998, he was appointed as the director, Flight Crew Operations, specifically selected to improve the flight and ground safety in the astronaut corps.

    Bringing his experience from the aerospace industry as a former NASA executive and astronaut, Jim joined the Oil and Gas Industry as a Safety and Operations Auditor for BP, America. As the VP, Operating Leadership, Jim helped to improve operating results consistently over the long-term, by emphasizing effective leadership behaviors to inspire people to perform with operating excellence.

    His book "Controlling Risk - In A Dangerous World" was published in 2017. Learn more about Jim at www.JimWetherbee.com

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the La Pine Public Library

  • Apr 6

    3:00 PM - Saturday - Meeting Room

    Explore how women in the 1960s contributed to NASA and broke barriers along the way.

    As NASA reached for the Moon in the late 1960s, women in the U.S. contributed to that effort and broke barriers in many other areas of American life. From the STEM fields to the corporate boardroom and from the university to the streets, women challenged their exclusion from positions of power and fought for the opportunity to contribute to the ground-breaking advancements of the era.

    Jamie Bufalino is an instructor in the Departments of History and Women's, Gender, and Sexuality Studies at the University of Oregon. She has a doctorate in History specializing in the histories of gender, race, and sexuality in the United States with special emphasis on social movements and consumer culture. She has taught extensively and conducted research in the areas of representations of race, gender, and sexuality in U.S. beauty culture, specifically advertising, as well as on the history of feminist movements in the U.S.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the East Bend Public Library

  • Apr 8

    6:00 PM - Monday - Brooks Room

    What is spacetime, and how does it hold the universe together?

    Spacetime is the mysterious way physicists model the fabric of the universe, but what is it and how do we know it exists? In this talk, Dr. Wendi Wampler will introduce the concept of spacetime, discuss its role in Einstein’s general theory of relativity, and outline the recent evidence of its existence through the observations of gravitational waves made at LIGO.

    Dr. Wendi Wampler is an Assistant Professor of Physics and Engineering at Central Oregon Community College. She graduated from Purdue with a degree in chemical engineering in 2004. Dr. Wampler returned to Purdue to get her bachelors and then doctorate in physics, with a focus in both astrophysics and physics education in 2013. Since then, she has been teaching algebra and calculus-based physics courses at the community college level, where she enjoys the instructional freedom, small class sizes, and working with non-traditional students.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 10

    3:00 PM - Wednesday - Meeting Room

    Astronaut Jim Wetherbee shares space stories.

    Former NASA astronaut, Jim Wetherbee, the only American astronaut to have commanded five space missions, shares stories of Apollo 8 and what it took to get the first astronauts around the Moon and back.

    In 1968, for the first time in Earth’s four and a half billion year history, three men got up one morning - and left. Who was responsible for the decision to send men to the moon on that first flight? How do people make such decisions? Astronauts eagerly climb onto a rocket and live or die as a consequence of their own decisions. But what does it take to live with the decisions made in the Mission Control Center when other people live or die as a result?

    Since the beginning of the space program, astronauts have developed techniques based on the principles of operating excellence to make effective decisions and execute missions while staying alive in unforgiving environments. Hear how these principles-based techniques can help each of us optimize performance in hazardous operations, business, and everyday life to help us accomplish much more in our dangerous world - or out of this world!

    With thirty-five years of experience in high-hazard operational environments, Jim is passionate about helping leaders and operators in dangerous endeavors with critical mission objectives.
    Jim began his career as a Naval Aviator aboard the USS John F Kennedy, flying the A-7 Corsair. In his second tour, he was a test pilot in the F/A-18 Hornet.

    In 1984, Jim was selected to join NASA in its tenth group of astronauts. Over his twenty-year career, he flew six times on the Space Shuttle. The five-time commander flew two missions to the Russian Space Station, Mir, and two missions to the International Space Station. In 1998, he was appointed as the director, Flight Crew Operations, specifically selected to improve the flight and ground safety in the astronaut corps.

    Bringing his experience from the aerospace industry as a former NASA executive and astronaut, Jim joined the Oil and Gas Industry as a Safety and Operations Auditor for BP, America. As the VP, Operating Leadership, Jim helped to improve operating results consistently over the long-term, by emphasizing effective leadership behaviors to inspire people to perform with operating excellence.

    His book "Controlling Risk - In A Dangerous World" was published in 2017. Learn more about Jim at www.JimWetherbee.com

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Sisters Public Library

  • Apr 10

    6:00 PM - Wednesday - Brooks Room

    Central Oregon played host to astronauts preparing for the first lunar landing in the 1960s.

    During the 1960s, Oregon played an important role in the Space Race as a training ground for astronauts preparing for the first lunar landing. Many geologists thought that Central Oregon’s landscape and rocks resembled that of the Moon, making it an ideal training spot for astronauts to test gear and develop skills navigating challenging terrain.

    In this talk, Laura Ferguson, the Curator of Western History at the High Desert Museum, explores the role Central Oregon played in the space program, as well as highlights what life was like for those living in Bend at the time.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 11

    12:00 PM - Thursday - Brooks Room

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors. "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 11

    12:00 PM - Thursday - Multi-Purpose Room

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors.

    "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Redmond Public Library

  • Apr 12

    1:00 PM - Friday - Roundabout Books

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors.

    "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 12

    6:00 PM - Friday - Worthy Brewing * Registration Required

    Learn the origin of the Moon at Worthy Brewing.

    Learn the origin of the Moon from Astronomical Interpreter Tim Merrill. Merrill will discuss the most accepted scientific theory of the formation of our moon: the Giant Impact Theory.

    Hear how a solar system might be formed the general solar system based on "accretion disc theory," where swirling gas and dust chaotically coalesces into planetary bodies via planetary collisions.

    Explore lunar features and discover why our moon looks the way it does.

    Tim Merrill has been working for the Oregon Observatory as an Astronomical Interpreter for five years, where he practices armature astronomy and shares with the public his love of space.

    The Worthy Garden Club is co-hosting this event and allowing library patrons the use of the Hopservatory after the lecture.
    The Hopservatory is operated by the Worthy Garden Club, a 501©(3) non profit foundation, in conjunction with the Oregon Observatory at Sunriver, also a non-profit foundation. All proceeds from tours go to the WGC to support science literacy programs and initiatives.

    https://worthybrewing.com/hopservatory/


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  • Apr 13

    3:00 PM - Saturday - Multi-Purpose Room

    Unravel the historical threads, hidden in plain sight, of the Apollo 8 mission.

    A Jubilee is a special anniversary of an event, especially one celebrating twenty-five or fifty year milestones. As we mark the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8 we have the opportunity to recover histories that have been lost to the more popular historical account of the mission and the tumultuous events 1968.

    The discussion, led by Dr. Robert D Thompson, Jr. from Oregon State, will note how the, "historical threads, hidden in plain sight," are linked to current movements of today including #Black Lives Matter, Say Her Name, Moral Monday, and Standing Rock.Thompson will highlight historical threads in the tapestry of the story of Rocket Men - exemplified in the presence of the Radical Martin Luther King, Jr., the revelations of the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, and the computational and engineering genius of the four sable "computers" whose hard work and tremendous perseverance against historically entrenched social forces facilitated the success of the US space program.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Redmond Public Library

  • Apr 14

    1:00 PM - Sunday - Brooks Room

    Unravel the historical threads, hidden in plain sight, of the Apollo 8 mission.

    A Jubilee is a special anniversary of an event, especially one celebrating twenty-five or fifty year milestones. As we mark the 50th anniversary of Apollo 8 we have the opportunity to recover histories that have been lost to the more popular historical account of the mission and the tumultuous events 1968.

    The discussion, led by Dr. Robert D Thompson, Jr. from Oregon State, will note how the, "historical threads, hidden in plain sight," are linked to current movements of today including #Black Lives Matter, Say Her Name, Moral Monday, and Standing Rock. Thompson will highlight historical threads in the tapestry of the story of Rocket Men - exemplified in the presence of the Radical Martin Luther King, Jr., the revelations of the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, and the computational and engineering genius of the four sable "computers" whose hard work and tremendous perseverance against historically entrenched social forces facilitated the success of the US space program.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 16

    12:00 PM - Tuesday - Meeting Room

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors.

    "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the East Bend Public Library

  • Apr 16

    6:00 PM - Tuesday - Brooks Room

    Astronaut Jim Wetherbee shares space stories.

    Former NASA astronaut, Jim Wetherbee, the only American astronaut to have commanded five space missions, shares stories of Apollo 8 and what it took to get the first astronauts around the Moon and back.

    In 1968, for the first time in Earth’s four and a half billion year history, three men got up one morning - and left. Who was responsible for the decision to send men to the moon on that first flight? How do people make such decisions? Astronauts eagerly climb onto a rocket and live or die as a consequence of their own decisions. But what does it take to live with the decisions made in the Mission Control Center when other people live or die as a result?

    Since the beginning of the space program, astronauts have developed techniques based on the principles of operating excellence to make effective decisions and execute missions while staying alive in unforgiving environments. Hear how these principles-based techniques can help each of us optimize performance in hazardous operations, business, and everyday life to help us accomplish much more in our dangerous world - or out of this world!

    With thirty-five years of experience in high-hazard operational environments, Jim is passionate about helping leaders and operators in dangerous endeavors with critical mission objectives.
    Jim began his career as a Naval Aviator aboard the USS John F Kennedy, flying the A-7 Corsair. In his second tour, he was a test pilot in the F/A-18 Hornet.

    In 1984, Jim was selected to join NASA in its tenth group of astronauts. Over his twenty-year career, he flew six times on the Space Shuttle. The five-time commander flew two missions to the Russian Space Station, Mir, and two missions to the International Space Station. In 1998, he was appointed as the director, Flight Crew Operations, specifically selected to improve the flight and ground safety in the astronaut corps.

    Bringing his experience from the aerospace industry as a former NASA executive and astronaut, Jim joined the Oil and Gas Industry as a Safety and Operations Auditor for BP, America. As the VP, Operating Leadership, Jim helped to improve operating results consistently over the long-term, by emphasizing effective leadership behaviors to inspire people to perform with operating excellence.

    His book "Controlling Risk - In A Dangerous World" was published in 2017. Learn more about Jim at www.JimWetherbee.com

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 17

    1:00 PM - Wednesday - Herringbone Books

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors.

    "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Redmond Public Library

  • Apr 17

    6:00 PM - Wednesday - Bend Science Station * Registration Required

    Build and launch old-fashioned bottle rockets.

    Build and launch old-fashioned bottle rockets at Bend Science Station. The Bend Science Station provides high-quality, laboratory-based science education for more than 7,000 students and their teachers a year in Central Oregon. Bend Science Station: open minds and open doors, empowering young scientists to change lives, including their own. Try your own hand at classic science fair experiments.

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  • Apr 18

    6:30 PM - Thursday - Wild Ride Brew

    Sing the songs of 1968 as part of A Novel Idea.

    Music played a large role in the American culture of 1968. Iconic songs from "Hey Jude" to "Sittin' on the Dock of the Bay" were in constant rotation on the radio and shaped the consciousness of music lovers across the country. Join Sing Bend's Public (ROCK) Choir Sing-along, led by Deena Kamm, for a deep dive into the music of 1968 (with a few space-themed songs thrown in for fun) and belt out songs without feeling self-conscious or worried about who can hear you and who's watching. It's not about being a great singer, it's about joining our collective voices and singing our faces off because it's good for you and it feels good too..

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Redmond Public Library

  • Apr 20

    10:30 AM - Saturday - Meeting Room

    Americans in 1968 endured one of the most tumultuous years in American history.

    1968 is remembered as the year that the United States nearly had a collective nervous breakdown. The year began with the Tet Offensive, during which North Vietnamese troops invaded the heavily guarded US Embassy in Saigon and ended with the election of Richard Nixon in November. Americans were exhausted. Dr. William Rorabaugh from the University of Washington unpacks one of the most contentious years in American history.

    Professor William Rorabaugh teaches American History at the University of Washington in Seattle. He is the author of seven books, including "The Alcoholic Republic (Oxford, 1979)," "Berkeley at War: The 1960s (Oxford, 1989)," "American Hippies
    (Cambridge, 2015)," and "Prohibition: A Concise
    History (Oxford, 2018)."

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the East Bend Public Library

  • Apr 20

    1:00 PM - Saturday - Multi-Purpose Room

    Americans in 1968 endured one of the most tumultuous years in American history.

    1968 is remembered as the year that the United States nearly had a collective nervous breakdown. The year began with the Tet Offensive, during which North Vietnamese troops invaded the heavily guarded US Embassy in Saigon and ended with the election of Richard Nixon in November. Americans were exhausted. Dr. William Rorabaugh from the University of Washington unpacks one of the most contentious years in American history.

    Professor William Rorabaugh teaches American History at the University of Washington in Seattle. He is the author of seven books, including "The Alcoholic Republic (Oxford, 1979)," "Berkeley at War: The 1960s (Oxford, 1989)," "American Hippies
    (Cambridge, 2015)," and "Prohibition: A Concise
    History (Oxford, 2018)."

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Redmond Public Library

  • Apr 23

    6:30 PM - Tuesday - Worthy Brewing

    Sing the songs of 1968 as part of A Novel Idea.

    Music played a large role in the American culture of 1968. Iconic songs from "Hey Jude" to "Sittin' on the Dock of the Bay" were in constant rotation on the radio and helped shaped the consciousness of music lovers across the country. Join Sing Bend's Public (ROCK) Choir Sing-along, led by Deena Kamm, for a deep dive into the music of 1968 (with a few space themed songs thrown in for fun) and belt out songs without feeling self-conscious or worried about who can hear you and who's watching. It's not about being a great singer, it's about joining our collective voices and singing our faces off because it's good for you and it feels good too..

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the East Bend Public Library

  • Apr 24

    1:00 PM - Wednesday - Meeting Room

    Rediscover misunderstood aspects of the Viet Nam War.

    In this brief talk on the war in Viet Nam, look in-depth at the origins of the Viet Nam conflict and the various parties involved. Professor Christoph Giebel, of the University of Washtingon, will relate the Viet Nam War to the Geneva Accords of 1954, using one example from 1965 to illustrate how opposing sides in the 1960s used imagery and rhetorical frames to mobilize support for the costly war. Professor Giebel will look at the complex socio-political-military situation in the 1960s to reveal how representations of the conflict have tended to obscure realities of the conflict.

    A hospital ship medic in the Vietnamese refugees crisis around 1980, Professor Christoph Giebel in 1986/87 became the first West German to study in post-war Viet Nam. He ultimately earned his PhD in Southeast Asian History in 1996 at Cornell University. Teaching at UW-Seattle since 1998, in the Jackson School of International Studies, he frequently leads UW programs to Viet Nam, focused on legacies and memories of war. As well, in the History Department, he is the Col. Donald Wiethuechter Endowed Faculty Fellow in the History of War and Society.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the La Pine Public Library

  • Apr 24

    6:00 PM - Wednesday - Brooks Room

    Rediscover misunderstood aspects of the Viet Nam War.

    In this brief talk on the war in Viet Nam, look in-depth at the origins of the Viet Nam conflict and the various parties involved. Professor Christoph Giebel, of the University of Washtingon, will relate the Viet Nam War to the Geneva Accords of 1954, using one example from 1965 to illustrate how opposing sides in the 1960s used imagery and rhetorical frames to mobilize support for the costly war. Professor Giebel will look at the complex socio-political-military situation in the 1960s to reveal how representations of the conflict have tended to obscure realities of the conflict.

    A hospital ship medic in the Vietnamese refugees crisis around 1980, Professor Christoph Giebel in 1986/87 became the first West German to study in post-war Viet Nam. He ultimately earned his PhD in Southeast Asian History in 1996 at Cornell University. Teaching at UW-Seattle since 1998, in the Jackson School of International Studies, he frequently leads UW programs to Viet Nam, focused on legacies and memories of war. As well, in the History Department, he is the Col. Donald Wiethuechter Endowed Faculty Fellow in the History of War and Society.

     Add to Calendar  |   Find the Downtown Bend Public Library

  • Apr 26

    12:00 PM - Friday - Meeting Room

    First satellite, first dog, first man in space--hear how.

    Over the course of four years, from 1957 to 1961, the launches of Sputnik-1, the dog Laika, and astronaut Yuri Gagarin (respectively the first artificial satellite, the first animal in the Earth's orbit, and the first human in space) astounded the world and came to represent the crowning achievements of the Soviet space program. How did the Soviets get there? In this talk, Cassio de Oliveira will tell the story of how space exploration became a central concern of the Soviet regime. The narrative begins with the influence of rocket scientist (and science fiction author) Konstantin Tsiolkovsky on Soviet scientists since before World War II, and continues through the formation of the Soviet military complex after the war. We will find out more about the secret "Star City" of Baikonur in the Kazakh Steppe, and about Gagarin's transformation into a pop figure after his famous flight.Cassio de Oliveira is an Assistant Professor of Russian in the Department of World Languages and Literatures at Portland State University, where he teaches courses on Russian language and culture and on 20th-century European history and culture. Cassio’s research interests include Soviet literature from the 1920s and 1930s, Russian film, and translation studies. He is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Writing Rogues: Collective and Individual Identity-Formation in the Soviet Picaresque, 1921-1938. A native of Brazil, Cassio earned his doctorate at Yale University and has an undergraduate degree from Bard College, in New York State, where he first started studying Russian. On his first semester there, he picked a seminar on Russian literature in translation on a whim. He enrolled in a Russian language course the next semester, and, before you could finish saying Zdravstvuite, he had made the decision to major in Russian.
    For more information, see https://works.bepress.com/cassio-deoliveira/.

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  • Apr 26

    8:00 PM - Friday - Oregon Observatory at Sunriver

    Search the night sky for nebulae, galaxies, star clusters, and planets at the Novel Idea star party.

    The Oregon Observatory at Sunrier has the largest collection of telescopes for public viewing in the United States. Sunriver's elevation, pitch-dark surroundings and crystal clear air make it a perfect location for stargazing. With the help of Observatory staff and volunteers you'll search for nebulae, galaxies, star clusters, and more. What you'll be able to see is dependent on the weather. The Observatory is open to the elements so please dress accordingly.

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  • Apr 27

    1:00 PM - Saturday - Brooks Room

    Learn how the Soviets almost won the Space Race.

    Over the course of four years, from 1957 to 1961, the launches of Sputnik-1, the dog Laika, and astronaut Yuri Gagarin (respectively the first artificial satellite, the first animal in the Earth's orbit, and the first human in space) astounded the world and came to represent the crowning achievements of the Soviet space program. How did the Soviets get there? In this talk, Cassio de Oliveira will tell the story of how space exploration became a central concern of the Soviet regime. The narrative begins with the influence of rocket scientist (and science fiction author) Konstantin Tsiolkovsky on Soviet scientists since before World War II, and continues through the formation of the Soviet military complex after the war. We will find out more about the secret "Star City" of Baikonur in the Kazakh Steppe, and about Gagarin's transformation into a pop figure after his famous flight.Cassio de Oliveira is an Assistant Professor of Russian in the Department of World Languages and Literatures at Portland State University, where he teaches courses on Russian language and culture and on 20th-century European history and culture. Cassio’s research interests include Soviet literature from the 1920s and 1930s, Russian film, and translation studies. He is currently working on a book manuscript entitled Writing Rogues: Collective and Individual Identity-Formation in the Soviet Picaresque, 1921-1938. A native of Brazil, Cassio earned his doctorate at Yale University and has an undergraduate degree from Bard College, in New York State, where he first started studying Russian. On his first semester there, he picked a seminar on Russian literature in translation on a whim. He enrolled in a Russian language course the next semester, and, before you could finish saying Zdravstvuite, he had made the decision to major in Russian.
    For more information, see https://works.bepress.com/cassio-deoliveira/.

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  • Apr 28

    4:00 PM - Sunday - Bend High School

    "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" author reads at the final Novel Idea 2019 event.

    Tickets are free but required and are available starting April 6th at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

    Rocket Men shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

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  • Apr 29

    6:00 PM - Monday - Sunriver Books and Music

    Read and discuss "Rocket Men: The Daring Odyssey of Apollo 8 and the Astronauts Who Made Man's First Journey to the Moon" with friends and neighbors.

    "Rocket Men" byt Robert Kurson shares the inside story of the dangerous Apollo 8 mission. In early 1968, the Apollo program was on shaky footing. President Kennedy’s end-of-decade deadline to put a man on the Moon was in jeopardy, and the Soviets were threatening to pull ahead in the space race. By August 1968, with its back against the wall, NASA decided to scrap its usual methodical approach and shoot for the heavens. With just four months to prepare, the agency would send the first humans in history to the Moon. In a year of historic violence and discord - the Tet offensive, the assassinations of MLK and RFK, the Chicago DNC riots - the Apollo 8 mission was the boldest test of what America could do. With a focus on astronauts Frank Borman, Jim Lovell and Bill Anders, and their wives and children, Rocket Men is a vivid account of the epic danger involved, and the bravery it took to leave Earth for the first time.

    Kurson began his career as an attorney, graduating from Harvard Law School. His professional writing career began at the Chicago Sun-Times, where he started as a sports agate clerk and soon gained a full-time features writing job. In 2000, Esquire published “My Favorite Teacher,” his first magazine story, which became a finalist for a National Magazine Award. His stories have appeared in Rolling Stone, The New York Times Magazine, and other publications. His other books include "Shadow Divers," "Pirate Hunters," and "Crashing Through."

    Kurson will be speaking at Bend High on Sunday, April 28. Tickets are free but required and become available on Saturday, April 6 at www.dplfoundation.org and at all branch libraries.

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Page Last Modified Wednesday, February 20, 2019


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